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1989 Cycle

Project Finder

1987-1989 Cycle
Award Recipients
Al-Kindi Plaza

The developed area is a governmental and ambassadorial precinct that includes, in addition to embassies, consulates and various related structures, residential areas for officials and diplomats, as well as public space and secluded picnic areas for the citizens of Riyadh. The multi-lane, clover-leafed expressway that borders the development to the east and south is screened by intensive and concentrated landscaping. The Al-Kindi Plaza lies between two secondary roads that form an arc dividing the development in two roughly equal segments.

Citra Niaga Urban Development

Before its transformation, this site was inhabited by a low-income migrant population working as street peddlers. These hawkers are still there occupying over 200 stalls provided for them free of charge by the urban development programme. Other built units include 79 smaller shops catering to high and medium income groups; 141 shop houses arranged in arcades, as well as infrastructural and recreational facilities. Pedestrian precincts are landscaped and automobiles are restricted to the periphery of the site. The entire complex is unified by the use of traditional roof forms.

Corniche Mosque

The powerful silhouette of this mosque, one of three set as pavilions along the corniche of Jeddah, facing the Red Sea, proclaims to all the presence of Islam. Classically Islamic in form, it has been rethought and transformed to serve contemporary purposes. Technologically, this building reflects the architect's extensive research in the methods whereby Egyptian mosques of the traditional high culture were built. The entire structure is of brick coated with plaster except for the dome interior in which the bricks are exposed and painted a dark bronze colour.

Grameen Bank Housing Programme

Bangladesh is one of the poorest and most populous countries in the world. Like most developing nations, it has a severe housing problem.The Grameen Bank is a co-operative non-governmental association that first began a loan programme, without collateral, for the rural poor to help them initiate income generating schemes. This proved successful, the incomes of the loan recipients rose, and most were able to repay the bank.

Great Omari Mosque

This late 13th-century mosque of the Bahri Mamluk period is the oldest standing in Sidon. Built on the remains of a Crusader fortress, the south wall is still braced by five sturdy Crusader buttresses, in stylistic and chronological juxtaposition to the minaret executed by the Ottomans in the second half of the 19th century. This outstanding monument was severely damaged by shellfire during the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon. Its users, instead of building a new mosque, elected to restore their old one, the funds having been provided by a native son living in Paris.

Gürel Family Summer Residence

This housing compound, designed by an architect for himself and his family, extends along the crest of a rocky site sloping downward to a beach. Hugging the stone boundary wall parallel to the road, yet informally arranged among the pine, olive and oak trees, are seven small, spare and simple one-storey, stuccoed and whitewashed buildings, traditionally constructed in masonry, with timber ceilings and clay tile roofs. Two of the units are for living (with kitchens), and four are for sleeping (with bathrooms). The seventh is a common service unit, adjacent to the parking space.

Hayy Assafarat Landscaping

The developed area is a governmental and ambassadorial precinct that includes, in addition to embassies, consulates and various related structures, residential areas for officials and diplomats, as well as public space and secluded picnic areas for the citizens of Riyadh. The multi-lane, clover-leafed expressway that borders the development to the east and south is screened by intensive and concentrated landscaping. The Al-Kindi Plaza lies between two secondary roads that form an arc dividing the development in two roughly equal segments.

Institut du Monde Arabe

This center of Arab culture occupies a beautiful site on the left bank of the Seine, facing the Ile St-Louis from the riverside edge of the University of Paris.The building consists of a museum, a library, an auditorium, offices and meeting rooms assembled within two wings separated by a courtyard opening out toward the Cathedral of Notre-Dame. The translucent marble façade of the seven-storey northern wing is elegantly curved to follow the sweep of the quay.

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

This stately government building is rooted in two Islamic architectural traditions, the vernacular as found in the local mud brick Najdi architecture, and the monumental as expressed in such works as the Alhambra and the Taj Mahal. Surrounded by villas and office buildings, it provides office space for 1'000 employees; meeting, conference and prayer rooms; banquet, library, auditorium, exhibition and parking facilities. The two semi-circular structures on either side of the main entrance house on the left the banquet hall, and on the right the library.

National Assembly Building

Clear in form and composition, powerful in scale and siting, this building is widely considered a masterpiece. The architect drew upon and assimilated both the vernacular and monumental archetypes of the region, and abstracted and transformed, to a degree of utter purity, lasting architectural ideas from many eras and civilisations. The core of the composition is the assembly chamber, a 300-seat, 30-meters high, domed amphitheatre and the library. These spaces alternate among eight light and air courts" and a restaurant, as well as entrances to the garden and mosque.

Rehabilitation of Asilah

Asilah is an ancient coastal town founded in Phoenician times. Its defensive walls were built in the medieval period when it was a Portuguese trading post. Today it is a harbour, a market, a centre for cultural events and a summer resort. Protection of Asilah's architectural heritage began over 15 years ago with the efforts of the two founding patrons of the cultural association, and other interested intellectuals. The works they have restored and rehabilitated include the Portuguese fortifications and an early 20th-century palace.

Sidi El Aloui Primary School

Conceived as an alternative to standard school design in Tunis, this building, carefully related to its context, came about through the efforts of a local citizens' group. The school is located in a very dense sector of the Tunis medina. Erected on a site left vacant since its housing was demolished in the 1960's, the entrance façade faces a public park. This façade is symmetrical about the park's principal axis. Its wing is one storey higher than the rest of the school to bring it into the scale of neighbouring structures and accommodate the headmaster's suite.