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The Ninth Award Cycle

Members of the 2004 Steering Committee

Members of the 2004 Award Master Jury

Report of the Master Jury

Awards Recipients

Interview with the Secretary General

Other Award Cycles

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The Ninth Award Cycle, 2002-2004


What's New

Recipients of the 2004 Aga Khan Award for Architecture Announced by India’s Prime Minister and His Highness the Aga Khan - 27 November 2004 (Press Release)

Address made by His Highness the Aga Khan - 27 November 2004 (Speech)

Address made by Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh - 27 November 2004 (Speech)

Recipients of the 2004 Awards

Background information on the restoration of the gardens of Humayun's Tomb

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture Award (Home page)


Introduction
Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh and His Highness the Aga Khan at Humayun's Tomb.Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh and His Highness the Aga Khan at Humayun's Tomb
(View press release)
The Aga Khan Award for Architecture was established in 1977 by His Highness the Aga Khan, the 49th hereditary Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims, to enhance the understanding and appreciation of Islamic culture as expressed through architecture. Its method is to seek out and recognise examples of architectural excellence, encompassing concerns as varied as contemporary design, social housing, community improvement and development, restoration, reuse, and area conservation, as well as landscaping and environmental issues. Through its efforts, the Award seeks to identify and encourage building concepts that successfully address the needs and aspirations of societies in which Muslims have a significant presence.

The selection process emphasises architecture that not only provides for people's physical, social, and economic needs, but that also stimulates and responds to their cultural and spiritual expectations. Particular attention is given to building schemes that use local resources and appropriate technology in an innovative way, and to projects likely to inspire similar efforts elsewhere.

The Award is organised on the basis of a calendar spanning a three-year cycle, and is governed by a Steering Committee chaired by the Aga Khan. (Members of the 2004 Award Steering Committee will be announced during the course of 2002.) Prizes totalling up to US$ 500,000 - the largest architectural award in the world - are presented every three years to projects selected by an independent Master Jury. The Award has completed eight cycles of activity since 1977, and documentation has been compiled on over 7,000 building projects located throughout the world. To date, the Master Juries have identified eighty-four projects to receive Awards. The Ninth Award Cycle covers the period from 2002 to 2004.

Award Presentation Ceremony
New Delhi, India
> View video of the Ceremony

Review and Selection Procedure

2004 Master Jury
The Master Jury Report
Members of the 2004 Award Master Jury
View video of Master Jury Deliberations and Process of Selection

On-Site Technical Review
The Technical Reviewers are architectural professionals specialised in various disciplines, including housing, urban planning, landscape design, and restoration. Their task is to examine on-site each of the projects short-listed by the Master Jury, verify project data, and seek additional information such as user reactions. The reviewers must consider a detailed set of criteria in their written reports, and must also respond to the specific concerns and questions prepared by the Master Jury for each project. To ensure maximum objectivity, reviewers report on projects located outside their native countries.

Selection of Award Recipients
The Master Jury studies the findings presented by the Technical Reviewers on each short-listed project during a final week-long meeting. After evaluating the projects in closed sessions, the jurors select the Award recipients and determine the apportionment of the US$ 500,000 prize fund. Since the success of a winning project may be the product of efforts by diverse individuals, groups, and organisations, the Master Jury apportions prizes among the contributors - architects, other design and construction professionals, craftsmen, clients, and institutions - whom it considers most responsible for the success of each project. The decisions of the Master Jury are final.

2004 Award Steering Committee
The members of the 2004 Award Steering Committee are:


Seminars and Publications
The Award publishes the proceedings of its international and regional seminars as well as cyclical monographs recording the recipients and discussions of each Award cycle. Most Award publications are available in English; some are also published in Arabic, Turkish, French, and Chinese. Further information may be obtained by contacting the Award Office or visiting our publications page.

The most recent cyclical monograph, entitled “Architecture and Polyphony : Building in the Islamic World Today”, features the recipients of the 2004 Aga Khan Award for Architecture, and is available from the publishers, Thames & Hudson. The publisher can be contacted by email or by facsimile to (44.171) 845.5050.

The monograph featuring the 2001 cycle of the Award, entitled “Modernity and Community: Architecture in the Islamic World”, is also available from the publishers, Thames & Hudson. The publisher can be contacted
by email or by facsimile to (44.171) 845.5050.

Many Award publications are now available at the ArchNet Digital Library, which is an on-line resource focusing on architecture, urban design, urban development, and related issues in the Muslim world. The site is a collaboration between the The Aga Khan Trust for Culture and the Massachuetts Institute of Technology, but many other institutions have contributed to building the database. For more information, visit the ArchNet website.

Related Programmes
Historic Cities Programme, which focuses on the physical, social, and economic revitalisation of historic sites in the Muslim world.

Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture, which is dedicated to the study of Islamic architecture, visual arts, conservation, urban design and rehabilitation. It aims to improve the teaching of Islamic art and architecture, promote excellence in professional research, and enhance the understanding of Islamic architecture and urbanism in light of contemporary developmental issues.

ArchNet.org, an on-line resource focusing on architecture, urban design, urban development, and related issues in the Muslim world (in cooperation with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

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